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Airship Fionnula

Hovering over the point where the Forties, sci-fi, fantasy and dieselpunk collide.

2nd
Sep
Fri
  • “ The dirigible was eventually killed by that which has attempted to kill everything which shows some spirit or character: the mass media. I won’t remind you all of the images which ruined airships for humanity. I have this recurring fantasy that airships will eventually come back into vogue, along with quality thinking, gin martinis, grey flannel trousers and cool uniforms. It’s probably ridiculous, like the idea of building a steam engine equipped boat in modern days, but I have the fantasy anyway. ”

    - Scott Locklin. The Airship : An Aesthetic Appreciation. (via my-ear-trumpet)

    In praise of air-ships #2

    Tags: dirigible zeppelin airship 
    Notes: 30
    Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet
  • 2nd
    Sep
    Fri
  • my-ear-trumpet:

U.S.S. Akron approaches mooring mast

From Scott Locklin on Science | The Airship : An Aesthetic Appreciation:

The dirigible was invented at the last gasp of the era of heroic European exploration; Edwardian times or thereabouts. In my opinion, this is one of the great spiritual eras humanity has yet experienced. Everything superior in our present civilization peaked or dates from that era. From classical music, to capitalist industry, to modern science, to gentlemen’s clothing styles, to philosophy, to practical mathematics, to modern weapons; everything that is great about Western Civilization dates from around the time they invented the dirigible. When the history of the world is finally done, that time will be looked upon as being as defining as the golden age of Greece, the Italian Renaissance or the era of Augustus. Everything that came after was a repeat at best of what happened in those days. We don’t think of scientists without thinking of Einstein. We don’t think of industry without thinking of the early 20th century steel mill. We don’t think of men’s suits without thinking of old Saville Row. We don’t think of rifles which are appreciably different from those available in those days. Those days define our best qualities as certainly as the time of Marcus Furius Camillus defined the ancient Romans.
So it is with the Dirigible. This machine represented a sort of peak in mechanical embodiment of the adventurous spirit, when men would invent ridiculous machines, wear scarves and goggles, and go face the wild blue yonder with a giant bag of (generally explosive) gas, a latticework of the new wonder metal of aluminum, and some propellors. An airman was seen as a sailor of the skies; a much different thing from aeroplane pilot. There was no GPS. No weatherman of any use. Even radio was pretty wonky and primitive (and, in fact, on a hydrogen airship, quite a fire hazard). Survival of the airship depended on the mechanical genius, leadership skills and weather sense of the captain, and the teamwork and skill of a large crew. It didn’t always work out so well. Dirigibles were probably about as safe as the space shuttle, which is to say, not very.
When we watch science fiction today, these space romances often take place against the backdrop of what is essentially an airship, jazzed up with some knobs and buzzers. They’re big, they have lots of room in them, they have large crews and lots of workshops and peculiar looking technology, they get where they are going in a few days; shucks, many of them even look like airships. The V-2 rocket, which influenced how we think about what a space ship should look like, looked physically like a dirigible standing on its tail. There was no real reason for it to look that way (modern missiles are much more functional looking), except that the shape represents the vision of the future of that era.


In praise of airships #1

    my-ear-trumpet:

    U.S.S. Akron approaches mooring mast

    From Scott Locklin on Science | The Airship : An Aesthetic Appreciation:

    The dirigible was invented at the last gasp of the era of heroic European exploration; Edwardian times or thereabouts. In my opinion, this is one of the great spiritual eras humanity has yet experienced. Everything superior in our present civilization peaked or dates from that era. From classical music, to capitalist industry, to modern science, to gentlemen’s clothing styles, to philosophy, to practical mathematics, to modern weapons; everything that is great about Western Civilization dates from around the time they invented the dirigible. When the history of the world is finally done, that time will be looked upon as being as defining as the golden age of Greece, the Italian Renaissance or the era of Augustus. Everything that came after was a repeat at best of what happened in those days. We don’t think of scientists without thinking of Einstein. We don’t think of industry without thinking of the early 20th century steel mill. We don’t think of men’s suits without thinking of old Saville Row. We don’t think of rifles which are appreciably different from those available in those days. Those days define our best qualities as certainly as the time of Marcus Furius Camillus defined the ancient Romans.

    So it is with the Dirigible. This machine represented a sort of peak in mechanical embodiment of the adventurous spirit, when men would invent ridiculous machines, wear scarves and goggles, and go face the wild blue yonder with a giant bag of (generally explosive) gas, a latticework of the new wonder metal of aluminum, and some propellors. An airman was seen as a sailor of the skies; a much different thing from aeroplane pilot. There was no GPS. No weatherman of any use. Even radio was pretty wonky and primitive (and, in fact, on a hydrogen airship, quite a fire hazard). Survival of the airship depended on the mechanical genius, leadership skills and weather sense of the captain, and the teamwork and skill of a large crew. It didn’t always work out so well. Dirigibles were probably about as safe as the space shuttle, which is to say, not very.

    When we watch science fiction today, these space romances often take place against the backdrop of what is essentially an airship, jazzed up with some knobs and buzzers. They’re big, they have lots of room in them, they have large crews and lots of workshops and peculiar looking technology, they get where they are going in a few days; shucks, many of them even look like airships. The V-2 rocket, which influenced how we think about what a space ship should look like, looked physically like a dirigible standing on its tail. There was no real reason for it to look that way (modern missiles are much more functional looking), except that the shape represents the vision of the future of that era.

    In praise of airships #1

    Tags: U.S.S. Akron airships zeppelins Edwardian 
    Notes: 22
    Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet
  • 2nd
    Sep
    Fri
  • dollymacabre:

Louise Brooks


The lovely Louise Brooks.

    dollymacabre:

    Louise Brooks

    The lovely Louise Brooks.

    Tags: Louise Brooks pistols chicks with guns 
    Notes: 74
    Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet
  • 2nd
    Sep
    Fri

    One Dance, 100 Costume Changes, 100 Years of Style.

    Not convinced of accuracy but lovely images all the same.

    Tags:
    8th
    Aug
    Mon
  • maudelynn:

Motocyclette New Map by Henry Le Monnier c.1931 

    maudelynn:

    Motocyclette New Map by Henry Le Monnier c.1931 

    Tags:
    Notes: 14
    Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet
  • 8th
    Aug
    Mon
  • laughingsquid:

Color Photos of 1940s New York City
    Tags:
    Notes: 249
    Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet
  • 7th
    Aug
    Sun
  • Tags:
    Notes: 233
    Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet
  • 7th
    Aug
    Sun
  • magpie-mind:

1940s fashion mademoiselle magazine March 1944 by wondertrading on Flickr.
    Tags:
    Notes: 31
    Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet
  • 6th
    Aug
    Sat
  • americangothgirl:

Dreamy.
goingtothedolls:

So borrowing some ideas from this for a photo shoot I have planned.  Love it.

    americangothgirl:

    Dreamy.

    goingtothedolls:

    So borrowing some ideas from this for a photo shoot I have planned.  Love it.

    Tags:
    Notes: 107
    Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet
  • 6th
    Aug
    Sat
  • fleetsparrow:

amoderndandy:

sydneyflapper:

judywald:

Louise Brooks - atypical hairstyle and unusual dress.
1920’s

 The dress is interesting because it’s actually a shawl draped to look like a dress…there was a bit of a fad for this in the 1920s, usually with the large Chinese export shawls (this one is quite lovely in its abstract patterns). There are stories of starlets going to parties wearing nothing but a shawl and some smashing heels. There were asymetrical gowns in the 1920s off one shoulder, but they weren’t common. I have a vague idea that this still was used as one of the photos of Lulu that the Egyptian is shown in Pandora’s Box. I’m about due to watch the movie again - must keep an eye out for that scene!

I love her hair in this picture!

Everything is lovely.

    fleetsparrow:

    amoderndandy:

    sydneyflapper:

    judywald:

    Louise Brooks - atypical hairstyle and unusual dress.

    1920’s

     The dress is interesting because it’s actually a shawl draped to look like a dress…there was a bit of a fad for this in the 1920s, usually with the large Chinese export shawls (this one is quite lovely in its abstract patterns). There are stories of starlets going to parties wearing nothing but a shawl and some smashing heels. There were asymetrical gowns in the 1920s off one shoulder, but they weren’t common. I have a vague idea that this still was used as one of the photos of Lulu that the Egyptian is shown in Pandora’s Box. I’m about due to watch the movie again - must keep an eye out for that scene!

    I love her hair in this picture!

    Everything is lovely.

    Tags:
    Notes: 86
    Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet
  • »

    Accent Red by Neil Talwar